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Explore the Spirituality of Aging in Educational Series at Weber Center

February 18, 2019, Adrian, Michigan – Two Adrian Dominican Sisters are offering an educational series that explores the promises and challenges associated with aging. Sisters Patricia Walter, OP, and Carol Johannes, OP, present the Aging and Spirituality series from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays, March 5, 12, and 19, 2019, at Weber Retreat and Conference Center.

Sister Patricia taught theology at Siena Heights University in Adrian; Aquinas Institute of Theology, a Dominican graduate school in St. Louis, Missouri; the Angelicum in Rome; and St. Mary Seminary in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Sister Carol has been involved in the ministry of spiritual direction and has conducted workshops, directed retreats, and led groups exploring issues of spirituality. Both Sister Carol and Sister Patricia are former Prioresses of the Adrian Dominican Congregation. 

Registration is required and a free-will offering will be taken. To register, visit www.webercenter.org and click on “programs.” Registration may also be made by contacting Weber Center at 517-266-4000 or webercenter@adriandominicans.org.

Weber Center is on the campus of the Adrian Dominican Sisters’ Motherhouse, 1257 E. Siena Heights Drive, Adrian. Enter the Eastern-most driveway of the complex and follow the signs to Weber Center. For information, call Weber Center at 517-266-4000. 


Composting, Recycling, and Worms Are Features of Adrian Dominican Sustainability Efforts

February 15, 2019, Adrian, Michigan – Composting, recycling, and worms – those are some of the elements of the sustainability efforts at the Adrian Dominican Sisters’ Motherhouse Campus and the focus of the sustainability update presented by Sister Corinne Sanders, OP, Director of Sustainability. 

Living more sustainability is the focus of one of four Enactments approved by delegates at the Adrian Dominican Congregation’s 2016 General Chapter. The Sustainability Enactment calls on the Sisters as a Congregation and as individuals to “sacrifice to mitigate significantly our impact on climate change and ecological degradation.” 

Sister Corinne spoke in particular of efforts by the Sisters to recycle when possible, and to compost organic material. Through the services of Key Green Solutions, the Congregation is able to track how much of its waste goes to the landfill or is recycled or composted, she said. This tracking system revealed that during the 2018 calendar year, some 85 percent of the waste from the Motherhouse campus went to the landfill. This benchmark could motivate Sisters and Co-workers on campus to focus more on recycling and composting to reduce the amount of waste that goes to the landfill, Sister Corinne said.

Weber Retreat and Conference Center is systematically increasing the practice of composting on the Motherhouse Campus by providing plates, cups, and napkins made of compostable material. Sister Corinne added that the best way to cut down on waste, however, is to use the ceramic mugs available at Weber Center’s coffee station.

During much of the presentation, questions about specific practices in recycling and composting were raised as people on campus strive to live more sustainably. Living sustainably “takes a lot of creativity, a lot of thinking, and a lot of changed behavior,” Sister Corinne acknowledged.

On a lighter note, Sister Corinne noted the success of the Congregation’s efforts to compost through the vermiculture process, in which worms help to break down compostable material. The Motherhouse campus now hosts 150,000 worms in its composting bin, an intergenerational community.


 

 

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