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Motherhouse Permaculture Cares for Earth and Brings Food to Dining Room Tables

November 10, 2017, Adrian, Michigan – The 7-acre permaculture (permanent agriculture) site at the Adrian Dominican Sisters Motherhouse Campus benefits the eco-system and the climate while bringing special treats to dining room tables at the Motherhouse. Elaine Johnson, Permaculture Specialist, explained the principles of permaculture and gave a virtual tour of the many aspects of the Congregation’s permaculture grounds in a recent presentation.

Permaculture is a “land-based design” for agriculture, in which practitioners learn from the rhythms and ways of nature and follow the principles of  “Earth Care, People Care, Fair Share,” Elaine explained. Unlike traditional agriculture, which focuses on cash crops, permaculture aims to “revitalize the eco-system” so that the system is “not only productive for us, receiving the food, but it’s also productive for the Earth system,” to bring about land restoration.

Elaine Johnson

In her presentation, Elaine explained various beneficial aspects of the Congregation’s permaculture site, from a rain catchment system that allows the Motherhouse to rely on recaptured rainwater for irrigation, to berms and swales – depressions and raised land to help in water retention. 

Elaine also spoke of ways that permaculture can offset some of the damage of greenhouse gasses and climate change caused by the emission of carbon into the atmosphere. Carbon farming uses the soil as a “sink” to store the carbon and keep it out of the atmosphere. “The carbon sink in the soil is a partnership between plants and the sun and the soil,” Elaine explained. Plants take in the carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and store the carbon in their roots and exchange the carbon with soil organisms. “The organisms have that carbon in their bodies, and then they decompose and become part of the soil life cycle … so that it doesn’t come up into the atmosphere.”

On a more practical note, Elaine spoke of the community garden, kitchen garden, and edible food forest that help put food on the tables of people in the Adrian area, including those in the Motherhouse. This year, she said, the permaculture site produced 650 pounds of large tomatoes and 70 pints of bite-sized tomatoes, which were used in the Motherhouse salad bar, along with a variety of vegetables and assorted herbs used in preparing meals.

“One of the benefits is that it gave our diners more of a variety of vegetables, such as chard and root vegetables,” said Susan Kremski, Director of Food Services. She added that the blueberries and blackberries were plentiful and a “real treat” for the Sisters, Co-workers, and guests. 

“This is the first big year for permaculture,” Susan said. The kitchen staff will work with the Co-workers from the permaculture site to evaluate this year and determine how to improve on the partnership for next year.

For more information on the permaculture site and how the many areas have been designed after studying nature, watch the video of Elaine’s presentation below.

 


Maureen Brooker, Adrian Dominican Motherhouse Chef, Wins Culinary Creation Contest

July 6, 2016, Washington, DC – Chef Maureen (Moe) Brooker, chef of the Adrian Dominican Sisters Motherhouse, took first place in the Culinary Creation Contest for her creation, Spicy Chicken Breast with Pumpkin Seeds and Vegetable Medley. Her award-winning entrée earned her the Culinary Cup

Maureen’s dish was voted Number One by 450 of her peers at a special dinner, during which the entrees created by four finalists in the competition were prepared by the hotel chefs. The dinner took place in the midst of the Foodservice Forum – part of an annual conference sponsored by Premier Purchasing and held June 21-24, 2016, in Washington, DC. Maureen and her supervisor, Susan Kremski, attended the conference. 

Susan Kremski (left), Director of the Food Services Department, and Chef Maureen Brooker pose with the award-winning dish.

“This is a real honor,” Susan said. “We’re really proud of her.”

Susan explained that the Adrian Dominican Sisters’ Motherhouse campus purchases much of their goods through Premier Purchasing, which serves businesses in a number of fields. Premier’s food service clients include universities, elementary and high schools, health care systems, and prisons.  

This is the second year that Chef Moe has entered the Culinary Creation Contest. Laster year, the contest focused on desserts, and her entry came in eighth place.

To enter this year’s competition, chefs had to follow very specific requirements, Maureen said. “One portion, including one side, should have no more than 500 calories, 17 grams of fat, and 1,600 grams of sodium,” as well as be original and creative. She calculated that one portion of her dish carries 354 calories, 14 grams of fat, and 580 grams of sodium.

Maureen said that her creation is similar to what she serves her family sometimes. “I just tweaked it to fit into the parameters.” Some of the ingredients – Brussel sprouts and pumpkin seeds – are popular these days, and even trendy. Most important, Maureen said, her daughter likes this dish. “It can’t be that bad if a 14-year-old eats it!”

Maureen came to the Adrian Dominican Motherhouse Campus with a great deal of experience. After graduating from Culinary school in 1991, Maureen said, she worked for seven years at Oakwood Common, a senior community in Dearborn, Michigan. She worked her way up from pastry chef to executive chef. Her career has also included serving as chef at Host Marriott and, for 11 years, as a chef at St. George Village Retirement Community, sponsored by the Archdiocese of Atlanta. “I’ve had my own restaurant,” she said. “I’ve had my own catering business. I’ve worked for bars and grills. I’ve had a litany of different places I’ve worked, and I enjoy it.”


 

 

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