Preaching


The OP after our names stands for “Order of Preachers,” the formal name of the religious order founded in 1216 by St. Dominic. As Dominicans, we preach with our lives—in both word and deed—guided by a search for truth (veritas) and a commitment to contemplate and share the fruits of our contemplation (contemplate et aliis tradere). 

Our Dominican lives are shaped by the interconnecting movements of study, prayer, communal life, and ministry. 

Dominic so firmly believed in the importance of study to the preaching mission that he provided a rule of “dispensation” from other responsibilities in the event they interfered with study. We are women committed to study. Through prayer and contemplation we interiorize our learnings and enter into communion with the Source of all truth. Our communal life orients us to the common good of the whole Earth community. And in ministry, our preaching takes effect.

As women of the Gospel, our preaching is also expressed in word. Read reflections on the Word of God posted by Adrian Dominican Sisters and Associates on the Praedicare Blog below.

 


Preaching for Easter Sunday 2021

Easter Sunday
Preaching by Sister Elise D. García, OP

April 4, 2021

Scripture Readings:
Acts 10: 34a, 37-43
Corinthians 5: 6b-8
John 20: 1-10

Here we are on this glorious Easter morning! And yet the Gospel passage the Church gives us for reflection today is, well, not quite so glorious. 

It is not one of the scenes of the risen Christ, like the passage that immediately follows where Jesus appears to Mary Magdalen as a gardener whom she recognizes as soon as he calls her by name. Or the passage after that when Jesus appears that evening to the disciples, entering the locked house where they hide in fear, showing them his wounds and breathing the Holy Spirit on them. Or the passage after that when, a week later, Jesus appears to the doubting Thomas and blesses those who have not seen yet come to believe. 

No, this passage holds no such beloved familiar scenes, no such epiphanies. This passage leaves us suspended – perplexed, in confusion, not knowing. 

Something significant has happened: The stone on the tomb has been rolled away. The linen cloths that were wrapped around Jesus’ body, with a mixture of myrrh and aloes that weighed about a hundred pounds, are lying in one pile. The cloth that had been wrapped around his head was rolled up in a place by itself. The new unused tomb was once again empty. The body gone.

The disciples did not understand and returned home. And we know from the next passage that Mary Magdalene remained standing outside the tomb, weeping.

Is this not where we so often find ourselves? Knowing that something significant has happened but not yet able to make sense of it? Not yet knowing what it means or what comes next?

Is this not where we are right now with the coronavirus pandemic? It feels like we have reached a threshold moment, with so many of us vaccinated. Yet rising cases with new fast-spreading variants are keeping us suspended, still apart from one another. No fullness of new life just yet. There is still great weeping in the land. 

As I reflect on this passage, I realize that one of the things it does allow is for us to linger a bit longer in the reality, the crushing reality of the immense suffering that our ancestors in the faith – Mary, Peter, John and other very real women and men – were experiencing on this day, some 2000 years ago. As a people living under the yoke of a terrible oppression, with its daily indignities and constant threat of violence, one of their own was hung from a tree.  

And this one among them, Jesus, had given them hope for a new order where hatred, deception and fear would give way to a radical freedom and love that he himself preached and lived. This one among them, Jesus, preached a powerful liberating spirituality, as Black mystic Howard Thurman, PhD, wrote in his prophetic book, Jesus and the Disinherited.1

What do you preach to a people in a world where you are despised – as the occupying Romans despised the Jews, as white segregationists and supremacists despised Black people and other people of color – to this day? In Jesus, Dr. Thurman writes, we discover someone who issues a profound call to each and every one of us to live out of our “inward center” – out of the depths of our heart and soul – as he himself did. This profound liberation of heart and soul leads to an inner freedom, the kind the world witnessed in Nelson Mandela, when he walked out of prison “in graceful triumph”2 after 27 years of incarceration.

As we rightly celebrate the great joy of this day of new life, let us also accept the invitation to linger long enough by the tomb to remember how Jesus lived this new life, during his life, as one among the disinherited. Jesus calls us all to fulfill our own high destiny through a liberating spirituality of dedication and discipline, practiced daily in our current reality, living out of the inward center of our hearts and souls where we are all one in the Spirit.3

And for the gift of this new life, we give great thanks and sing, alleluia, alleluia!

 

1 See Howard Thurman, Jesus and the Disinherited (Boston: Beacon Press, 1996).
2 Vincent Harding, Foreword, Jesus and the Disinherited, xvi.
3 Thurman, 99.

your Comment will be showing after administrator's approval







b i u quote


Save Comment
Showing 1 Comment
Avatar  Don Davies 3 years agoReply

Preaching is no easy matter. It takes sacrifice, effort, and of course practicing what you preach. I admire the Black Pastor preaching of Keion Henderson, https://www.keionhenderson.com/about-us/ for really being a sincere and legitimate man of God. His sermons are what this current and new generation needs. May he be blessed and may he continue his good works for the Lord!




 

LINKS

word.op.org - International Dominican Preaching Page

Catholic Women Preach - Featuring deep spirituality and insights from women

Preach With Your Life - Video series by Adrian Dominican Sisters

 


 

Recent Posts

  • Preaching for Easter Sunday 2024 by Sister Bibiana "Bless" Colasito, OP Posted last week
    Easter Sunday 2024 Preaching by Sister Bibiana "Bless" Colasito, OP Sunday, March 31, 2024 John 20:1-18   Good morning, everyone! Today’s Gospel shows the reversal of an androcentric world thinking of male dominance even in the interpretation of grace. This world thinking of male dominance was not patronized by Jesus in today’s gospel. In fact, ...
  • Preaching for Easter Vigil 2024 by Sister Elise García, OP Posted last week
    Easter Vigil 2024 Preaching by Sister Elise García, OP Saturday, March 30, 2024 Mark 16:1-7   And so it is that women were the first to witness that Jesus was raised. Women who had followed Jesus from Galilee to Jerusalem. Women who stood by him at the foot of the cross through his passion ...
  • Preaching for Good Friday 2024 by Sister Lorraine Réaume, OP Posted last week
    Good Friday 2024 Preaching by Sister Lorraine Réaume, OP Friday, March 29, 2024 Isaiah 52:13 - 53:12 Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9 John 18:1 - 19:42   How can someone be so powerful and so vulnerable at the same time? Jesus is very clear who he is: "I am! I am!" he declares twice. No one intimidates him, even ...
  • Preaching for Holy Thursday 2024 by Sister Corinne Sanders, OP Posted last week
    Holy Thursday 2024 Preaching by Sister Corinne Sanders, OP Thursday, March 28, 2024 Exodus 12:1-14 1 Corinthians 11:23-26 John 13:1-15   Tonight we gather on this most holy night which begins the Triduum – the sacred three days that mark our faith. In the Gospel, it is, as John says, the festival of Passover and Jesus ...
  • Preaching for Palm Sunday 2024 by Sister Frances Nadolny, OP Posted last week
    Palm Sunday 2024 Preaching by Sister Fran Nadolny, OP Sunday, March 24, 2024 John 12:12-16   Good morning! Here it is Palm Sunday and it was exactly three months ago that we celebrated a glorious Christmas Eve liturgy. Our liturgical year, in conjunction with the activity of our full moon in the wonders ...
  • Preaching for New Year's Day 2024 by Sister Frances Nadolny, OP Posted 3 months ago
    Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God New Year's Day 2024 Preaching by Sister Fran Nadolny Monday, January 1, 2024 Numbers 6:22-27 Galatians 4:4-7 Luke 2:16-21   Good Morning and Happy New Year! Our New Year greeting and wishes for you are simple, taken right from this morning’s Book of Numbers: May our God ...
  • Preaching for the Feast of the Holy Family 2024 by Sister Corinne Sanders, OP Posted 3 months ago
    Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph December 31, 2023 Preaching by Sister Corinne Sanders Sunday, December 31, 2023 Sirach 3:2-6, 12-14 Hebrews 11:8, 11-12, 17-19 Luke 2:22-40   On this day – the Feast of the Holy Family – we continue to be in the days of incarnation, a time of promises fulfilled. ...
  • Preaching for Christmas Day 2023 by Sister Lorraine Réaume, OP Posted 4 months ago
    2023 Christmas Day Preaching by Sister Lorraine Réaume, OP Monday, December 25, 2023 Isaiah 52:7-10 Hebrews 1:1-6 John 1:1-18   At Christmas time, we enjoy the traditional images of the baby Jesus in a manger, with Mary and Joseph, the shepherds, the wisemen, the angels, and an assortment of animals. For 800 years that has been ...
  • Preaching for Christmas Eve 2023 by Sister Elise Garcia, OP Posted 4 months ago
    2023 Christmas Eve Preaching by Sister Elise Garcia, OP, Prioress Sunday, December 24, 2023 Isaiah 9:1-6 Titus 2:11-14 Luke 2:1-14   “Divine Love Becomes Incarnate.” That’s the wonderful title of the chapter in a new commentary that begins with today’s Gospel. The commentary is part of a marvelous new series offering a feminist interpretation for every book ...
  • Preaching for the Feast of St. Dominic by Sister Patricia Harvat, OP Posted 8 months ago
    2023 Feast of St. Dominic Preaching by Sister Patricia Harvat, OP Tuesday, August 8, 2023 Isaiah 52:7-10 2 Timothy 4:1-8 Matthew 5:13-19   We place upon your table a gleaming cloth of white: The weaving of our stories, the fabric of our lives; The dreams of those before us, the ancient hopeful cries, The promise of our future: our ...
Read More »