In Memoriam


(1937-2020)

“She had the heart for hard conversations. Truth telling. Denise’s heart, her courage, showed through at every stage of her life.”

These words by Sister Mary Ann Dixon, in her homily for Sister Denise Devitt, drew upon the Gospel reading Sister Denise had chosen for her funeral: John 20:19-22, which includes Jesus’ exhortation “do not let your hearts be troubled.”

“The root of the word courage is cor – the Latin word for ‘heart,’” Sister Mary Ann said. “In one of its earliest forms, the word ‘courage’ meant ‘to speak one’s mind by telling all one’s heart.’ That [Sister Denise] did! She spoke her mind and it revealed her heart, her strong heart.”

Sister Denise was born Catherine Denice (but was always known as Denise) Devitt on June 17, 1937, in Chicago. Her parents were Thomas, a homicide detective with the Chicago Police Department, and Irene (Mackey) Devitt. She was the older of two children in the family; her sister Pat was born four years after her.

Read more about Sister Denise (pdf)

make a memorial giftMemorial gifts may be made to Adrian Dominican Sisters, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, Michigan, 49221.

 

Apologies for a technical error that prevented the Vigil Service for Sister Denise from being recorded.

Funeral for Sister Denise (Thomas Irene):


Download video. Videos will be posted for 4-6 weeks, then removed.

 

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(1932-2020)

Agnes Ann Peplinski was born March 14, 1932, in Parisville, Michigan, to Matthew and Lucy (Zmich) Peplinski. Parisville, which is an unincorporated community within Paris Township in Huron County, at the tip of Michigan’s “Thumb,” was one of the first Polish settlements in the United States, and both sets of Agnes’ grandparents were immigrants to that locale from Prussia, making them a combination of Polish and German.

Like many other Huron County residents, Matthew was a farmer. He and Lucy had eighteen children in all, two of whom died in infancy; Lucy herself died in April 1947. Agnes attended grade schools in Forestville, Minden City, and Port Sanilac, Michigan, and graduated from Sandusky High School in Sandusky, Michigan, in May 1950.

She wrote in her letter to Mother Gerald seeking entrance to the Congregation that she had come to know the Adrian Dominican Sisters through summer school programs in Port Sanilac; Sister Mary Richard Rea had taught her particular class, and it was at that time, in eighth grade, that she knew she wanted to enter religious life. A high school retreat at Dominican High School in Detroit cemented her choice of which community it was to be.

Read more about Sister Agnes (pdf).

make a memorial giftMemorial gifts may be made to Adrian Dominican Sisters, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, Michigan, 49221.


Leave your comments and remembrances (if you don't see the comment box below, click on the "Read More" link).


(1948-2019)

On December 25, 2019, as the Adrian Dominican Sisters joined with Christians around the world in celebrating Jesus’ birth, Sister Joanne Podlucky was born into new life as she went to meet Jesus face to face.

Joanne Theresa Podlucky was born March 22, 1948, in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, to Joseph and Julia (Viboch) Podlucky. She was the oldest of five children, with Joseph, Ronald John, Francine, and Carolyn following her into the family.

The Podluckys were a close-knit family in a close-knit community. Like so many Johnstown men, Joseph was a steelworker, while Julia took care of the home and family, and in their Slovak and Italian neighborhood, everyone knew everyone and people looked out for each other.

Sister Joanne and her siblings all attended Sts. Peter and Paul School, where they were taught by the Vincentian Sisters of Charity. She went on to Vincentian Academy, a boarding school in Pittsburgh, for high school. Such a lengthy relationship with the VSC Sisters, plus the fact that an aunt was in that religious community, led Joanne to decide to enter that congregation at the beginning of her senior year, and she finished high school as a postulant. When she was received as a novice in August 1966, she was given the religious name Sister Jessica.

Read more about Sister Joanne (PDF)

make a memorial giftMemorial gifts may be made to Adrian Dominican Sisters, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, Michigan, 49221. Funeral arrangements are being handled by Anderson-Marry Funeral Home, Adrian.


Leave your comments and remembrances (if you don't see the comment box below, click on the "Read More" link).


(1940-2019)

Someone who loved children, especially babies; friend to those most in need of help; a caring, generous woman with a sense of humor: those were some of the ways in which Sister Mary Ann Ferguson was remembered by other Adrian Dominican Sisters at the time of remembrance held after her passing.

Sister Mary Ann was born on August 10, 1940, in the small Detroit enclave of Hamtramck, in a neighborhood near Detroit City Airport. She was the oldest of eight children born to Edmund and Lydia (Wyborny) Ferguson. After her came Edmund Jr., Ronald, Jacqueline, Thomas (who died as a baby), Kenneth, Gwendolyn, and Timothy.

Edmund, who had come to Detroit from Houghton, Michigan, worked at Garwood Industries, which was owned by the legendary Detroit powerboat racer Gar Wood.  Lydia, a Detroit native, was a typist for the R.L. Polk Company, producer of business directories.

Having both parents in the workforce meant that the Ferguson children were often looked after by their grandparents. And, as the oldest child, Mary Ann was expected to help with many of the tasks around the house – which she did not mind one bit. “I was eager to learn household chores from my grandmother and mother,” Sister Mary Ann said in her life story. “’Little Mom’ was my nickname.”

Read more about Sister Mary Ann (pdf)  

make a memorial giftMemorial gifts may be made to Adrian Dominican Sisters, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, Michigan, 49221. 

 


Leave your comments and remembrances (if you don't see the comment box below, click on the "Read More" link).


Cemetery of the Adrian Dominican Sisters

Our Adrian Dominican cemetery with its circular headstones is a beautiful place of rest for women who gave their lives in service to God — and a peaceful place for contemplation and remembrance. 


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