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Adrian Dominican Sisters Share Stories of Experience in Resilient Communities

August 28, 2018, Adrian, Michigan – Neighbors in an abandoned area of Detroit, people evicted from their ancestral lands and living in a “squatters’ community” in a desert area of the Dominican Republic, and the homeless population in the State of Washington. People in these situations were able to overcome their desperate circumstances, form community, and improve their lives with the help of individual Adrian Dominican Sisters. 

| VIEW A VIDEO RECORDING OF THE PRESENTATION AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS ARTICLE |

Sister Patricia Siemen, OP, Prioress, lights the Christ Fire at the beginning of Resiliency in our Midst.

The Sisters who ministered with the people to form these communities shared what they learned during an educational forum that was designed to help others in the Congregation to help create resiliency in their own communities. One of four Enactments of General Chapter 2016 commits the Congregation to “facilitate and participate in creating resilient communities with people who are relegated to the margins, valuing their faith, wisdom, and integrity.” 

Although resilient communities can be defined in a number of ways, the Adrian Dominican Sisters have adopted this working definition: “one that has a long-range sustainable vision that emerges from the community through an inclusive, collaborative process that engages diverse grassroots leaders and persons who have traditionally been marginalized; creates partnerships built on trust; seeks equity and justice; draws on spiritual wisdom and is healing; and reflects a concern for future generations, living within Earth’s regenerative capacity (i.e., ‘one-planet thinking’). These elements combine to promote the well-being and vitality of the community and its ability to address ongoing stressors from crises or disasters and sustain itself into the future.”

The Adrian Dominican Sisters’ Leadership Council designated 2018 as a year of study about resilient communities. Resiliency in our Midst, held on August 22 at Weber Retreat & Conference Center, brought forward the personal experiences of Sisters Janet Stankowski, OP; Maurine Barzantni, OP; and Judy Byron, OP. 

While the ministries they spoke of differ, the three Sisters also spoke of ways that they specifically fit the Congregation’s working definition of resilient communities. Many of these communities fit a number of aspects of the definition, but below are highlights. 

“… engages diverse grassroots leaders and persons who have traditionally been marginalized.”

Sister Maurine Barzantni, OP

In their ministry, Sisters Maurine Barzantni, OP, and Renee Richie, OP, waked with and fostered the leadership abilities of the local women living with their families in a cluster of houses – essentially a “squatter’s community” at the crossroads of Cruce de Arroyo Honda in the Dominican Republic. “We told them we couldn’t lead the meetings because our Spanish wasn’t good,” Sister Maurine said. They role-played with the women so that they could manage an upcoming meeting – and helped them to build up their confidence. “About a dozen women emerged as leaders.” 

Once the women came to understand that God did not want them to be poor, they worked together to meet the community needs that they themselves identified. Working as committees, they brought to their community prefabricated latrines; medical services, such as weekly consultations by two doctors, a pharmacy, and a medical lab; and Fe y Alegria Espiritu Santo, a school that began with 127 first-grade students ages 6 to 16. Because of earlier lack of educational opportunities, many of the students began first grade at an older age. The school now boasts a K-12 program with 1,500 students and professional teachers who graduated from their school. 

“Draws on spiritual wisdom and is healing …” 

Sister Janet Stankowski, OP

Sister Janet Stankowski, OP, and Associate Patricia Gillis founded Voices for Earth Justice as an interfaith community “praying, learning, and taking action together for Earth justice.” The community was developed to address the environmental injustice plaguing the people of Detroit. In 2011, they purchased five lots with two buildings in the Brightmoor area of Detroit and built Hope House as a “gathering place and resource for neighbors and visitors,” especially around the area of environmental justice. 

Voices for Earth Justice offers a number of workshops and retreats and leads the community in actions such as climate marches and lobbying with legislators, but remains focused on spirituality. “Prayer was and is our focus – to bring people together to pray for peace for all creation,” Sister Janet said. “We believe a spiritual transformation was needed to make the pollution and destruction stop.”

“Creates partnerships built on trust …” 

Sister Judy Byron, OP

Sister Judy Byron, OP, serves on the Board of Directors of Mercy Housing Northwest, an organization founded in 1992 through a collaboration of five communities of women religious in the Seattle area – including the Edmonds Dominican Sisters, now merged with the Adrian Dominican Sisters – and Mercy Housing, Inc. The goal was to create stable, permanent, affordable housing for groups that could otherwise be homeless, including low-income families, seniors, and immigrants and refugees. 

Today, Mercy Housing Northwest manages about 54 properties, residential complexes in the State of Washington that offer services such wellness and after-school programs. Many of those complexes were developed through partnerships. For example, Emerald City Commons – a 60-unit complex in Seattle – was developed through collaboration with an evangelical church, which had owned the property and wanted to build housing on it. Mercy Housing Northwest partnered with them to develop the complex, Sister Judy said. She explained that Mercy Housing Northwest also collaborates with government organizations, foundations, and other social service and non-profit agencies to develop housing for people in need. 

The models described by Sisters Janet, Maurine, and Judy can serve as inspiration for the various Resilient Communities Committees in the Congregation’s Mission Chapters explore areas in their geographic region where they can work with local residents to create resilient communities.

Feature photo (top): Sister Christa Marsik, OP, poses a question to one of the three panelists speaking during the Resiliency in our Midst educational forum.


From left, Sisters Janet Stankowski, OP, and Judy Byron, OP, listen to Sister Maurine Barzantni, OP, during a panel presentation. Associate Dee Joyner, Director of Resilient Communities, listens from the podium. 






Dominican Republic Issues Stamps to Honor Architect and Father of Two Adrian Dominican Sisters

June 8, 2018 – During a special ceremony, the Dominican Republic issued a postage stamp honoring Humberto Ruiz Castillo (1897-1966), a noted engineer and architect and father of two Adrian Dominican Sisters, Margarita (Margot) Ruiz, OP, and Teresita (Tete) Ruiz, OP. 

Fernando Ruiz – nephew of Sisters Margarita and Teresita Ruiz and grandnephew of Humberto Ruiz Castillo – represents the family in accepting the honor.

During the event – held May 29, 2018 at the University of Santo Domingo – Licentiate Modesto Guzman, Director of the Postal Institute, noted the special significance of commemorative stamps. A citizen receives greater honor when a stamp is issued in his or her name than when a street is named for the person. The street name is known usually only to the neighbors, while stamps travel all over the world. Those who receive the stamp may be interested in the person who is honored.

“We were delighted and profoundly touched by what people at the event said about our father,” Sister Margot said. “Some of the speakers emphasized that he was very honest, disciplined, and generous – an example for all of society. He put his heart into everything he did.” While their nephew, Fernando Ruiz, represented the family at the event, Sister Margot and Sister Tete watched videos of the event.

The stamps depict Humberto Ruiz Castillo on the bottom right-hand corner, surrounded by a variety of buildings that he had constructed. He designed and constructed several Catholic churches, as well as the Colegio Santo Domingo, the grade school and high school opened by Adrian Dominican Sisters. 

Humberto Ruiz Castillo taught for many years at the University of Santo Domingo, passing on to his students what he had learned in Europe. He was responsible for introducing Art Deco to his students, who in turn planted those seeds and spread them to new generations. He also co-founded the Dominican Republic’s first association of engineers and architects. 

For his many contributions to the Church, Humberto Ruiz Castillo was named Diocesan Architect. At the time, the Dominican Republic encompassed one diocese. In 1949, he was consecrated by the Holy See with the Order of St. Gregory the Great.

Feature photo: A series of commemorative stamps, issued by the Dominican Republic, honor Humberto Ruiz Castillo, designer of the Congregation’s Colegio Santo Domingo and father of Sisters Margarita Ruiz, OP, and Teresita Ruiz, OP.


 

 

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