What's Happening

rss


Specify Alternate Text

Note: This statement has been edited to include the most recent mitigation protocols.

March 13, 2020, Adrian, Michigan – As U.S. public health officials on March 9 called for stricter measures of social distancing to mitigate the accelerating community spread of COVID-19 in the United States, the Adrian Dominican Sisters took immediate steps to join in the national effort. Since then, the Congregation has continued to increase its efforts in mitigating the spread.

Effective June 17 through December 31:

  • All Congregation-related travel remains suspended.
  • All Congregation meetings will be held virtually
  • The Motherhouse campus remains closed to all guests and visitors.
  • All Sisters should avoid commercial travel.
  • All Weber Center in-person programming remains suspended.

Effective May 1 through June 30:

  • All Congregation-related travel remains suspended.
  • The Motherhouse campus remains closed to all Sisters, guests and visitors.
  • All Sisters should avoid travel.
  • All Mission Appeals are canceled for 2020. 
  • All Weber Center programming remains suspended.

Effective April 6:

  • All Co-workers must wear a face mask while they are on campus.

Effective March 20:

  • “Shelter in Place” for Adrian campus residents, who must remain on campus and in their communities;
  • Dining rooms closed and meals are delivered to campus residents;
  • St. Catherine Chapel closed to residents; liturgies continue with necessary personnel and are broadcast through closed circuit television.

Effective March 19:

  • Madden Hall administrative offices are closed to all, except critical Co-workers; others work from home, as possible;
  • Co-workers in positions critical to the care of the residents are screened daily for symptoms of illness.

Effective March 14:

  • In compliance with State Executive Order prohibiting visitors at health care and residential facilities, no outside visitors to the Motherhouse campus;
  • Co-workers are to self-screen, monitor, track, and report any symptoms of illness.

Effective March 10, the Congregation has suspended:

  • all Congregation-related travel as well as meetings, conferences, and gatherings involving travel by its 533 Sisters, 206 Associates and nearly 300 Co-workers;
  • personal travel by Sisters to areas where the virus has been reported and participation anywhere in social or other events involving larger groupings of people;
  • all workshops and programs sponsored or hosted by Weber Retreat and Conference Center; and 
  • visits by off-campus guests to the Dominican Life Center of the Motherhouse where the community’s elder members reside. 

A task force comprised of the Congregation’s Administrator and lay leaders of the Motherhouse campus are meeting daily to monitor the pandemic and to develop effective mitigation protocols and implement new measures as needed. As conditions warrant, these suspensions may be modified.  

The Adrian Dominican Sisters join with people around the world in prayer for the victims of the coronavirus, their families, and all healthcare workers who are courageously serving on the frontlines of this pandemic. In their letter to the community announcing this “prudential preventative action,” the five members of the General Council wrote that the measures were being implemented “for the common good of our own community and the larger communities in which we live and serve.”


September 18, 2020, Adrian, Michigan – At a time when so many issues and crises are grabbing the attention of the U.S. public, about 200 organizations that work with and advocate for immigrants and refugees in the United States have endorsed an immigration reform plan that they hope will be a blueprint for the next administration. 

“There’s no doubt that our immigration laws need to be changed, to be worked out,” said Sister Attracta Kelly, OP, immigration attorney. During a September 15, 2020 presentation, she reviewed immigration reform efforts from the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, which granted amnesty to many people who lived in the United States without legal status, through 2013, when a “very fine” immigration reform bill initiated by four Republican and four Democratic Senators failed to pass in the House of Representatives. 

But since 2016, Sister Attracta said, those efforts have been undermined – and hopes are that efforts to reform the immigration system will be strengthened in the 2021 Immigration Plan. While outlining the 10 steps of the plan, Sister Attracta also described the current situation in which immigrants endure much suffering, discrimination, insecurity, and fear of being deported to their native country – which many fled for their lives.

For example, step one in the plan is to “prioritize equity and harm reduction in the immigration system.” This step includes reinstating the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. DACA was designed to help young immigrants – ages 15 to 30 – to apply for deferral of deportation, giving them time to get a social security card and a driver’s license – and work toward legal status, Sister Attracta said. Most of the “Dreamers” applying for DACA have known the United States as their only home and fear the prospect of being deported to a country they don’t know.

President Trump called for an end to DACA in 2017, she said, and while the Supreme Court in June 2020 let the program stand, it has been diminished and does not allow for new applicants.

Step 10, Sister Attract said, would “restore and improve the U.S asylum, refugee, and other humanitarian programs.” The United States has accepted fewer and fewer refugees into the country, she said. In addition, the system of offering asylum to people facing persecution and death in their native countries has been dismantled. 

Starting in 2018-2019, “asylum seekers were sent back into Mexico to live on the streets and in tents with no access to counsel” until they received a court date for their case to be heard. Many are now sent back to what is designated as “the safest place” in Central America to await court hearing – yet none of these nations are truly safe because of struggles with war or other crises, she said.

Sister Attracta concluded by encouraging her viewers educate themselves on immigration issues; speak out on the injustices of the system and the benefits that immigrants bring to the United States; advocate with legislators for a just immigration system; and “welcome the refugee, immigrant, and asylum seeker.”

Read the 2021 Immigration Plan and watch the video of Sister Attracta’s presentation below. 
 

Presentation Slides (PDF)


 

 

Recent Posts

Read More »